Intrinsic And Extrinsic Limiting Factors

Intrinsic And Extrinsic Limiting Factors

Thank you for reading this post, don't forget to subscribe!

Consider the meaning of the term “ecology.” How do the ideas of energy and chemical cycles, community structure, biodiversity and succession fit together to form the basis of the way the natural world works? Explain how each of these ideas works and find ways to link between them. Present examples from your experience to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved.

Intrinsic And Extrinsic Limiting Factors

Some factors that control populations come from outside the population and are known as extrinsic limiting factors. Predators, the loss of a food source, a lack of sunlight, and accidents of nature are all extrinsic factors. However, the populations of many kinds of organisms appear to be regulated by factors from within the populations themselves. Such limiting factors are called intrinsic limiting factors. For example, a study of rats under crowded living conditions showed that, as conditions became more crowded, abnormal social behavior became common. There was a decrease in litter size, fewer litters per year were produced, the mothers were more likely to ignore their young, and many young were killed by adults. Thus, changes in the rats’ behavior resulted in lower birthrates and higher death rates, which limit population size. In another example, the reproductive success of white-tailed deer is reduced when the deer experience a series of severe winters. When times are bad, the female deer are more likely to have single offspring than twins.

Density-dependent limiting factors are those that become more effective as the density of the population increases. For example, the larger a population becomes, the more likely that predators will have a chance to catch some of the individuals.

Get a 5 % discount on an order above $ 20
Use the following coupon code :
topwritersleague