Disney through Feminist Standpoint

Frozen II—Disney through Feminist Standpoint

The rise of feminism—Disney heroines playing major roles this time round  on Disney through Feminist Standpoint.       —Feminists celebrate Frozen 2 sequel

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The trope of female protagonists and princesses playing passive roles in a society controlled by men permeated early Disney animated films. The well-known Disney heroines were not only attractive and subservient, but also incredibly obedient, patient, silent, frail, and powerless. Famous early Disney films like “Snow White” and “Sleeping Beauty” both had heroines who were attractive, submissive, and dependent, highlighting a typical stereotype of female characters in those early Disney movies (Stone 44). In traditional Disney animated films, heroes were typically flanked by guys. They were dissatisfied with their current situations and desired to wed a prince, which revealed some aspects of a patriarchal society (Wasko 44). But in contrast to the prevalent gender stereotyping that is typical of Disney’s older films.

The strong growth of feminism is a helpful force in the direction of achieving equality, offering men and women the same opportunities in a variety of fields, including leadership. The film’s strong, autonomous female characters represent certain aspects of a cultural transition from more patriarchal to matriarchal power structures. As a result, Frozen II is a manifestation of Disney’s ardent support for the rise of feminism in today’s society because it exemplifies how men should support women, highlights the importance of women in leadership roles as a sign of a matriarchal society, and suggests the possibility of men cooperating with women to achieve a common goal.

A common example of how males in positions of authority should help women is Frozen II. Kristoff, one of the main characters who serves as the movie’s representation of the man, fails to exhibit typical leading-man conduct. He fights alongside Anna during major confrontations instead of shielding her and offers her unwavering support without expecting anything in return, particularly by inquiring what kind of help she might need (Torres 2). Regardless of the difficulties the female protagonists confront, Kristoff, as a male character, neither provides protection nor holds Anna or Elsa back and prevents them from completing their goals. In other words, contrary to expectations, Kristoff does not lead the charge in resolving the problems at the kingdom.

Disney through Feminist Standpoint

The film shows Elsa and Anna taking the lead with little help from a relatively small number of men like Kristoff, in contrast to traditional Disney heroines in the early animated films (for example, Ariel in the Little Mermaid) who are surrounded by men in a patriarchal society. As female figures play a prominent role in what is typically thought of as a space for men, a supportive environment for women is highlighted in this instance, which helps to illustrate how chances for women are created.

Additionally, and maybe more significantly, the movie shows the beneficial power of female figures. It represents a trend in society toward a matriarchal structure, particularly in leadership roles. Disney movies used to depict a society where men reigned. On the other hand, female power exhibited badly while also portraying the power of men in a positive light (Wasko 44). Most of the female characters were portrayed in a way that minimized their strength as women. For instance, Disney portrayed Snow White as a reliant and innocent princess who depended on the prince and her male allies for survival, and the Sleeping Baby included various plots which promoted more the valor of the male prince as opposed to potential heroines (Garabedian 23).

But other critics have noted that recent Disney animated films have undergone modernization and transformation, especially in terms of how new females are portrayed (Wasko 44). These advancements can be seen in how modern Disney women are portrayed in animated movies. For instance, Frozen II portrays female protagonists in a way that upholds their femininity while simultaneously announcing their strengths and talents. Elsa represents the beauty that permeates all Disney female characters, with a thin, seductive, and shapely physique in addition to her assertive, tenacious, and brave temperament (Wasko 44).

But other critics have noted that recent Disney animated films have undergone modernization and transformation, especially in terms of how new females are portrayed (Wasko 44). These advancements can be seen in how modern Disney women are portrayed in animated movies. For instance, Frozen II portrays female protagonists in a way that upholds their femininity while simultaneously announcing their strengths and talents. Elsa represents the beauty that permeates all Disney female characters, with a thin, seductive, and shapely physique in addition to her assertive, tenacious, and brave temperament (Wasko 44).

The presence of male characters, such as Christopher, in the movie, however, seems to suggest that the heroines only collaborate with males in order to accomplish their objectives. Contrarily, for example, Elsa and Anna were shown as being in the foreground and playing a large part in terms of leadership and saving the Arendelle kingdom from the catastrophe that befell the empire, whereas Kristoff only provided minimal support in the background. For instance, Elsa and Anna were represented in the forefront playing a large role in terms of leadership and protecting the Arendelle kingdom from the catastrophe that befell the empire, whilst Kristoff just provided minimal support in the background.

The presence of male characters, such as Christopher, in the movie, however, seems to suggest that the heroines only collaborate with males in order to accomplish their objectives. Contrarily, for example, Elsa and Anna were shown as being in the foreground and playing a large part in terms of leadership and saving the Arendelle kingdom from the catastrophe that befell the empire, whereas Kristoff only provided minimal support in the background. For instance, Elsa and Anna were represented in the forefront playing a large role in terms of leadership and protecting the Arendelle kingdom from the catastrophe that befell the empire, whilst Kristoff just provided minimal support in the background.

Disney through Feminist Standpoint

Disney, on the other hand, favors depicting a reversed society, which is the exact opposite of the patriarchal societal structure. As a result, the resulting picture may not entirely address the problems with gender balance but rather encourages women to take the lead and pushes males to the sidelines. In order to portray an ideal picture of equality, Disney may think about incorporating a balanced number of characters from both genders with some form of shared responsibility in upcoming classic movies.

Works Cited

Garabedian, Juliana. “Animating Gender Roles: How Disney Is Redefining the Modern Princess.” James Madison University, Vol 2, no. 1, 2015, pp. 21–25.

Stone, Kay. “Things Walt Disney Never Told Us.” The Journal of American Folklore, vol. 88, no. 347, 1975, pp. 42–50., doi:10.2307/539184.

Stover, Cassandra. “Damsels and Heroines: The Conundrum of the Post-Feminist Disney Princess.” Lux, vol. 2, no. 1, 2013, pp. 1–10., doi:10.5642/lux.201301.29.

Torres, Libby. ‘Frozen 2’ Fans Are Praising Kristoff as the Feminist Prince Disney Needed and Calling the Movie a Rejection of ‘Toxic Masculinity’. 26 Nov. 2019, www.insider.com/frozen-2-kristoff-feminist-toxic-masculinity-2019-11. Accessed 2020.

Wasko, Janet. Understanding Disney: the Manufacture of Fantasy. Polity Press, 2020.

 

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