Create a Found Poem for “Sonnet 18

Create a Found Poem for “Sonnet 18

Thank you for reading this post, don't forget to subscribe!

Create a Found Poem for “Sonnet 18

Task

Create a Found Poem for “Sonnet 18.”   Look over the words in the sonnet and create a “love” found poem from Shakespeare’s work.  Think about the tone that the details and diction convey.  The words should all relate to love.  When you’re close to a final version, you may add a few words to make the poem flow more smoothly.

Found poems take existing texts and refashion them, reorder them, and present them as poems. The literary equivalent of a collage, found poetry is often made from newspaper articles, street signs, graffiti, speeches, letters, or even other poems.

A pure found poem consists exclusively of outside texts: the words of the poem remain as they were found, with few additions or omissions. Decisions of form, such as where to break a line, are left to the poet.

More about the Found Poem

Examples of found poems can be seen in the work of Blaise Cendrars, David Antin, and Charles Reznikoff. In his book Testimony, Reznikoff created poetry from law reports, such as this excerpt:

     Amelia was just fourteen and out of the orphan asylum;
at her first job—in the bindery, and yes sir, yes
ma’am, oh, so anxious to please.
She stood at the table, her blond hair hanging about
her shoulders, “knocking up” for Mary and Sadie,
the stichers (“knocking up” is counting books and
stacking them in piles to be taken away).

Many poets have also chosen to incorporate snippets of found texts into larger poems, most significantly Ezra Pound. His Cantos includes letters written by presidents and popes, as well as an array of official documents from governments and banks. The Waste Land, by T. S. Eliot, uses many different texts, including Wagnerian opera, Shakespearian theater, and Greek mythology. Other poets who combined found elements with their poetry are William Carlos WilliamsCharles Olson, and Louis Zukofsky.

The found poem achieved prominence in the twentieth-century, sharing many traits with Pop Art, such as Andy Warhol’s soup cans or Marcel Duchamp’s bicycle wheels and urinals. The writer Annie Dillard has said that turning a text into a poem doubles that poem’s context. “The original meaning remains intact,” she writes, “but now it swings between two poles.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment rewrite the poem below:

Look over the words in the sonnet and create a “love” found poem from Shakespeare’s work.  Think about the tone that the details and diction convey.  The words should all relate to love.  When you’re close to a final version, you may add a few words to make the poem flow more smoothly.

 

Sonnet 18

by William Shakespeare

Memorize the poem, Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare.

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

Thou art more lovely and more temperate:

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,

And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,

And often is his gold complexion dimm’d,

And every fair from fair sometime declines,

By chance, or nature’s changing course untrimm’d:

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,

Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st,

Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade,

When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st,

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,

So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

 

Get a 5 % discount on an order above $ 20
Use the following coupon code :
topwritersleague